Last edited by Brarr
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Water control in Tokugawa Japan found in the catalog.

Water control in Tokugawa Japan

William W. Kelly

Water control in Tokugawa Japan

irrigation organization in a Japanese river basin, 1600-1870

by William W. Kelly

  • 144 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by China-Japan Program, Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Japan,
  • Aka River Watershed
    • Subjects:
    • Irrigation -- Japan -- Aka River Watershed -- History.,
    • Water resources development -- Japan -- Aka River Watershed -- History.,
    • Irrigation engineering -- Japan -- Aka River Watershed -- History.,
    • Japan -- History -- Tokugawa period, 1600-1868.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby William W. Kelly.
      SeriesCornell University East Asia papers ;, no. 31
      ContributionsCornell University. China-Japan Program.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD1741.J32 A325 1982
      The Physical Object
      Paginationix, 260 p. :
      Number of Pages260
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3217793M
      LC Control Number83126822

        For the former head of the Tokugawa Art Museum, see Tokugawa Yoshinobu ().. Born: Died: Distinction: Fifteenth and final Tokugawa shogun (); Japanese: 徳川慶喜 (Tokugawa Yoshinobu, or Tokugawa Keiki) Yoshinobu was the seventh son of Tokugawa Nariaki, head of the Mito Tokugawa was adopted as heir of the Hitotsubashi Tokugawa clan, .   The book traces Tokugawa Ieyasu's life and career from a son of a minor warlord to Supreme Overlord of all Japan as first shogun of years reign of Tokugawa shogunate. The book hit all the major highlights of his career and carefully traced a slow but deliberate rise of Ieyasu's power and dominance. He was known as the man who took control Reviews:

      Tokugawa Policy • Shogun ruled in the name of the emperor – Emperor continued to remain as a figure head • Banned all Foreign Contacts from to – No Trade except with Dutch and Chinese • Established the Bakuhan system – Bakufu had control over the daimyo (feudal lords) • Daimyo had control over their han (feudal domains). Meiji Restoration, in Japanese history, the political revolution in that brought about the final demise of the Tokugawa shogunate (military government)--thus ending the Edo (Tokugawa) period ()--and, at least nominally, returned control of the country to .

        Tokugawa Japan book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers/5(21). A feudal regime of Japan established by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ru In theory the military head of Japan, but in reality the polit (Toyotomi) Hideyoshi (d. ).


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Water control in Tokugawa Japan by William W. Kelly Download PDF EPUB FB2

(shelved 1 time as tokugawa-history) avg rating — ratings — published Get this from a library. Water control in Tokugawa Japan: irrigation organization in a Japanese river basin, [William W Kelly; Cornell University. China-Japan Program.]. Japan’s Tokugawa (or Edo) period, which lasted from towould be the final era of traditional Japanese government, culture and society before the.

"Tokugawa Ieyasu; Shogun" is a book written by Yale Professor Conrad Totman. The book is an excellent source of information and insight for those who are interested in Japanese history.

Ieyasu was the first shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate, who ruled Japan from to Cited by: 8. The Edo period (江戸時代, Edo jidai) or Tokugawa period (德川時代, Tokugawa jidai) is the period between and in the history of Japan, when Japan was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's regional period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", Water control in Tokugawa Japan book popular.

Before the Tokugawa took power inJapan suffered through the lawlessness and chaos of the Sengoku ("Warring States") period, which lasted from to Beginning inJapan's "Three Reunifiers"—Oda Nobunaga, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu—worked to bring the warring daimyo back under central control.

Japan in the Tokugawa Period. Once dismissed as a feudal dark age, the Tokugawa period (–) now shines in the popular imagination as a golden age of peace and prosperity and is celebrated as the fullest expression of native Japanese culture before the arrival of Western imperialism changed Japan's place in the world forever.

No age is ever. The sankin kōtai (lit., "alternate attendance") system was a device of the Tokugawa shogunate, the government of Japan from todesigned to insure political control by the regime over the daimyo, or territorial lords, who exercised virtually autonomous authority over the more than feudal states into which four-fifths of the country was divided.

From toa secretive period under the Tokugawa dynasty of shoguns, or military overlords, Japan would largely cut itself off from the rest of the world. Japanese cultural life had reached a low ebb at the beginning of the Tokugawa period. The Japanese society which emerged when Tokugawa Ieyasu had completed the process of pacifying warring baronies was neither literary, nor hardly literate.

The rulers were. THE TOKUGAWA SHOGUNATE OF JAPAN 6. Toyotomi Hideyoshi Farmer turned military commander Takes control and moves capital to Osaka 7. •This marked the beginning of Japan's first true pop culture, a mass-production culture of the marketplace.

•Theatres came into being – women were banned from acting and acting was hereditary. Also see William Kelly’s studies of water management during the Tokugawa era, including Water Control in Tokugawa Japan: Irrigation Organization in a Japanese River Basin, Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University China-Japan Program, In Tokugawa period the central authority of the Tokugawa shogunate lasted for more than years.

Read More; adoption of censorate. In censor. The Tokugawa government (–) of Japan instituted a censorial system (metsuke) in the 17th century for the surveillance of affairs in every one of the feudal fiefs (han) into which the country was divided.

Japan, Tokugawa Period: Selected full-text books and articles The Making of Modern Japan By Marius B. Jansen Belknap Press, Librarian's tip: The first 10 chapters are about Tokugawa Japan.

Hiroshi HASEBE, Governance System of Flood Control In Tokugawa Japan 1 GOVERNANCE SYSTEM OF FLOOD CONTROL IN TOKUGAWA JAPAN: as the case study on the coexisting system of human being and nature in the Echigo Plain. Hiroshi HASEBE Tohoku University Kawauchi, Aoba-Ku, SendaiJapan Telephone & Fax: 81(Japan) TOKUGAWA JAPAN.

SETTING THE STAGE. s – SHOGUNS (military leaders) struggled to keep weak Japan unified. – civil war chaos & war result in shogun losing control. territorial lords gaining power.

over small domains of land – LACK OF UNITY feudalism. Powerless emperors being. controlled by shoguns. Education in the Tokugawa era. In a shogunate was established by a warrior, Tokugawa Ieyasu, in the city of Edo (present Tokyo).

The period thence to the year —the Tokugawa, or Edo, era—constitutes the later feudal period in era, though also dominated by warriors, differed from former ones in that internal disturbances finally ended and long-enduring peace ensued.

How Did the Tokugawa Shogunate Use Environmental Resources. Meiji Restoration, in Japanese history, the political revolution in that brought about the final demise of the Tokugawa shogunate (military government)--thus ending the Edo (Tokugawa) period ()--and, at least nominally, returned control of the country to direct imperial rule under Mutsuhito (the emperor Meiji).

The deceased ruler of Japan Toyotomi Hideyoshi had placed his son and heir under the care of five powerful daimyō. However, they all wanted power and at Sekigahara the most powerful won: Tokugawa Ieyasu.

Ieyasu would found a new shogunate which would rule Japan for over two centuries with it coming to an end in with the Meiji Restoration.

Lately, I've found myself getting more and more interested in Tokugawa Japan. This was once a "black hole" in my personal knowledge of Japan. I always thought the era seemed a bit stale and boring.I'm finding the more and more I read on the period, the more I.

The Japan of was a very different society: practically every samurai was literate and it was a world in which books abounded. The transformation which had occurred in these two and a half centuries was an essential precondition for the success of the policy which the leaders of the Meiji Restoration were to adopt.The Tokugawa clan (徳川氏、德川氏, Tokugawa-shi or Tokugawa-uji) was a powerful daimyō family of nominally descended from Emperor Seiwa (–) and were a branch of the Minamoto clan (Seiwa Genji) by the Nitta early history of this clan remains a mystery.

Members of the clan ruled Japan as shōguns from to and culture and introducing some historical debates regarding the Tokugawa period. It also gives references for further reading on important topics related to Tokugawa Japan. During the Great Peace of the Tokugawa era, many economic and societal changes occurred in Japan.

While the shogunate sought to maintain political control and its view of an.